“Holy Moments from Heaven”, a worship poem from L. Willows

a13715988_1747332822179919_703671116264867973_nWe will see Jesus, in the hour near.
Love lets the door press apart, banning all fear.
All kindred hearts will fill with deep sweetened air,
and breathe with the Touch that His Spirit does bear.

Oh such Holy moments from Heaven above,
will hasten our heartbeats with the flood of His Love.
Here do we join in full hope, faith and prayer…
Lost and then found in the gain of God’s Dare.

Calling the Glory of the Kingdom Declared,
Lives speak the Word of His Own unimpaired.
Blessed are the these Hearts with the Holy Beloved One,
We see Jesus today – Our Christ, The Lord’s Son.

© 2016 Linda Willows

“There You Are”, a poem from L.Willows (Grace, Hope, Faith)

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Somewhere,
in the day that tomorrow brings,
I see you smiling.
Your eyes are sparkling with dances
that light in a new horizon.
You are gathering;
swelling, like waters that fill into rivers
that pour love into view,
You are new.

Somewhere,
in the day that tomorrow brings
I see you healed;
your sweetened heart revealed.
Your life joins with beloveds,
in an eternal embrace.
You are in the arms of grace.

There you are,
in the dawn
that rises up to meet you,
wrapped by the most tender mercies
and a blanket of prayers.

There,
entwined, encouraged and seen;
you are with each good thing.
You are hope’s dream.
There, I see you.

There you are.
Somewhere.
Not a far smile away.
There, in the Promise,
of a bold new Day.

© 2020 Linda Willows

Philippians 3:13-14 —Brothers, I do not consider that I have made it my own. But one thing I do: forgetting what lies behind and straining forward to what lies ahead, I press on toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus

Ecclesiastes 3:11 —He has made everything beautiful in its time. Also, he has put eternity into man’s heart, yet so that he cannot find out what God has done from the beginning to the end.

Isaiah 43:18-19 —“Remember not the former things, nor consider the things of old. Behold, I am doing a new thing; now it springs forth, do you not perceive it? I will make a way in the wilderness and rivers in the desert.

“C.S. Lewis on Facing Trials”, with article by Gary Selby on the Screwtape Letters (Trusting God, Faith, God’s Will)

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The Wisdom of C.S. Lewis on Facing Life’s Trials

“The great thing, if one can, is to stop regarding all the unpleasant things as interruptions of one’s ‘own’, or ‘real’ life. The truth is of course that what one calls the interruptions are precisely one’s real life – the life God is sending one day by day: what one calls one’s ‘real life’ is a phantom of one’s own imagination.”
C.S. Lewis, (Spiritual Direction)

“God knows our situation; He will not judge us as if we had no difficulties to overcome. What matters is the sincerity and perseverance of our will to overcome them.”
C.S. Lewis, (Mere Christianity)

This wonderful article by Gary E. Selby offers the wisdom of C.S. Lewis from “The Screwtape Letters”  was in Christianity Today 

Screwtape’s Practical Advice for Dealing with the Present

What you should do is imagine all the bad things that could happen. Picture each awful possibility as you lie awake at 3 a.m., letting image after image flood your mind. Think about how you would bear it if you were sick from the coronavirus, or if COVID-19 struck someone you loved.

That’s what Screwtape would advise. A lot of people are looking for practical counsel at the present, and one excellent resource is a series of letters “written by Screwtape” and published by C. S. Lewis. Of course the author of The Screwtape Letters (which fell into Lewis’s hands sometime during the relentless Nazi bombing of London in 1940–1941), does not speak to our situation specifically. Screwtape said nothing about the coronavirus in his advice to his nephew Wormwood, a junior devil tasked with temping one particular human in the World War II era. Nevertheless, there is much to learn from the senior devil, and the lessons can be applied to our present situation.

For example, Screwtape has suggestions for what we might think about when we’re lying awake in bed at night. He tells Wormwood to encourage the human’s mind to run. “We want him to be in the maximum uncertainty, so that his mind will be filled with contradictory pictures of the future, every one of which arouses hope or fear.” Humans love to have “courage.” They like to imagine how they would “be strong” and exert control over the universe in lots of different hypothetical futures. “Let him forget,” Screwtape writes, “that, since they are incompatible, they cannot all happen to him, and let him try to practice fortitude and patience to them all in advance.”

Lewis, who was a rather old-fashioned Christian, tried to dissuade people from listening to this sage counsel. “Readers are advised to remember that the devil is a liar,” he wrote in the preface The Screwtape Letters in 1942. “Not everything that Screwtape says should be assumed to be true even from his own angle.”

Lewis would say that what we need to do in this situation is to “accept with patience the tribulation which has actually been dealt out to [us]—the present anxiety and suspense.” For him, the anxiety we feel about our future is our present cross. The Christian challenge is to take it up, like Jesus took up his cross. We should acknowledge our fear, ask God for help, and then to pray as Christ taught us, “Thy will be done.” When we do that, an amazing thing begins to happen. The power that fear holds over us, if not eliminated, is at least diminished, and we find the strength to carry on.

One only has to lay awake for an hour or two, though, mulling over the facts from that informative article on the first symptoms of COVID-19, to know that Screwtape’s advice is far more compelling. The choice between trusting prayer and sleepless worry is hardly a choice at all!

Author, GARY S. SELBY 

Christianity Today Magazine