“God’s Holy Moment”, a worship poem by LWillows (Spiritual Revival, See Jesus, Heaven and Earth)

God’s Holy Moment

Heart be paused to find the still
The place that knows His peace, His will
An inborn Spirit dwells deep inside
Swelled by Love from Holy tide.

Know that all can, even I –
Find the resting spot that waits
In the midst of life and mortal haste-
unwind my step towards God’s Gate.

In deep beseech, I ask His Heart
The granting of Love’s Hand to part.
And at that moment, may Grace come near
God’s Holy moment, the All, He is here.

Heart be born in the moment of pause
Seek the riches that rise from this, His worth.
For Heaven reaches to embrace our souls
in the adore of Love, we are given new Birth.

© 2018 Linda Willows

 

Revelation 21:1-4 –Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and the sea was no more. And I saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying, “Behold, the dwelling place of God is with man. He will dwell with them, and they will be his people, and God himself will be with them as their God. He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.”

“Pray like Spurgeon”, from the Spurgeon Center (Bold Prayer, God’s Promises, Beloveds at the Mercy Seat)

9 Ways To Pray Like Charles Spurgeon

In July 17, 1887 Augustus Strong and John D. Rockefeller visited Charles Spurgeon at his home in London.

After two hours, the leading Baptist theologian and the wealthy U.S. tycoon uncovered the secret of Spurgeon’s ministry: “He seemed to be a man of prayer” (Crerar Douglas, Autobiography of Augustus Hopkins Strong, 300).

Spurgeon’s prayers made you feel “the throbbing of that mighty heart” (C. H. Spurgeon’s Prayers, vii).

Spurgeon once said, “Prayer has become as essential to me as the heaving of my lungs, and the beating of my pulse” (MTP 49:476).

Prayer was the underbelly of Spurgeon’s ministry.

“Let me know the day when you give up praying for me,” he said, “for then I must give up preaching” (Autobiography 2:335).

Spurgeon teaches us how to pray. Here are nine ways to pray like Charles Spurgeon.

1. Grapple with God.

“It is on our knees that we overcome” (MTP 7:94).

“Unanswered petitions are not unheard” (MTP 13:74).

“That which is gained speedily by a single prayer is sometimes only a second rate blessing; but that which is gained after many a desperate tug, and many an awful struggle, is a full weighted and precious blessing. . . . The blessing which costs us the most prayer will be worth the most” (MTP 17:612).

2. Ask boldly! You are the beloved.

“Our God not only hears prayer but also loves to hear it” (Morning and Evening, November 3, AM, italics in the original).

“Do not let us go to God as though we were strangers, or as though he were unwilling to give—we are greatly beloved” (MTP 13:82).

“It would be of no use to knock at a wall, but you may wisely knock at a door, for it is arranged for opening” (MTP 29:306).

“God keeps a file for our prayers—they are not blown away by the wind, they are treasured in the King’s archives” (Morning and Evening, March 29, PM).

3. Hold God to his promises.

“He can reverse nature, but he cannot reverse his own nature, and he must do this before he forebear to hear and answer prayer” (MTP 7:93).

“A true prayer is the echo of the eternal purpose” (MTP 48:487).

“The Spirit of God leads us to desire exactly what God has decreed” (MTP 48:487).

“The best praying man is the man most believingly familiar with the promises of God. After all, prayer which is not based on a promise has no true foundation” (MTP 34:21).

4. Pray fervently when you don’t feel it.

“If you do not pray except when you feel like praying, you will not pray much, nor pray when you most need it. My brethren, when you do not feel like praying, you ought to pray all the more, and go to the Lord to help you to pray” (MTP 35:583).

“We must get rid of the icicles that hang about our lips. We must ask the Lord to thaw the ice-caves of our soul and to make our hearts like a furnace of fire heated seven times hotter” (MTP 13:79).

“We cannot commune with God, who is a consuming fire, if there is no fire in our prayers. . . . Prayers which are filled with doubt, are requests for refusal” (MTP 28:547).

5. Pray privately.

“The less prayer is observed on earth, the more it is observed in heaven” (MTP 30:136).

“You are no Christian if you do not pray. A prayerless soul is a Christless soul” (MTP 48:483).

6. Pray patiently.

“When prayer is long in the answering it will be all the sweeter in the receiving, like fruit which is well ripened by hanging longer on the tree” (MTP 20:306).

“Prayer does move the arm that moves the world” (MTP 41:524).

“The act of prayer is blessed, the habit of prayer is more blessed, but the spirit of prayer is the most blessed of all” (MTP 29:532).

7. Measure prayer by weight, not length.

“Short prayers are long enough. . . . Not length but strength is desirable” (Morning and Evening, January 14, AM).

“Some brethren pray by the yard; but true prayer is measured by weight, and not by length. A single groan before God may have more fulness of prayer in it than a fine oration of great length” (MTP 34:16).

8. Groan your way to God.

“The essence of prayer lies in the heart drawing near to God: and it can do that without words” (MTP 24:214).

“It may suit a teacher of English composition to criticize your sentences, but God thinks much more of your desires than of the words in which they are expressed. It may be natural for a scholar to consider the accuracy of your terms, but God specially marks the earnestness of your soul” (MTP 48:483).

“I would sooner see you eloquent with God than with men” (An All-Round Ministry, 314).

“A sigh, a sob, is the most you can get out. . . . The inward moanings of a broken heart are music in the ears of the Infinite Jehovah, and he accepteth the sincere prayers of his people” (MTP 60:512).

“Our poor prayers are blotted, and blurred, and stained with sin, but our great High Priest sprinkles them with his own most precious blood, and so purifies them, and then, with his own dear hand, he lays them before the mercy-seat, and for his sake they are sure to be accepted” (MTP 48:487-88).

9. Pray always.

“Souls abiding in Jesus open the day with prayer; prayer surrounds them as an atmosphere all day long; at night they fall asleep praying. I have known them even [to] dream a prayer” (MTP 34:15).

“Prayer is now as much a necessity of our spiritual life as breath is of our natural life” (MTP 34:15).

“These are dark days, but you can bring on a spiritual summertime if you know how to pray” (MTP 48:491).

“Continue, then, in prayer. Never let your fire go out” (MTP 7:92).

A Prayerful Plea from Spurgeon
“My dear friends, wait upon God much in prayer, and you have the promise that he will do greater things for you than you know of” (Spurgeon’s Prayers, 30).

Source: Spurgeon.org

From LW: Enjoy these Resources and Links on Prayer to learn more!

Resources on Prayer~

“Drawing Near to God”, The Saint’s Happiness by Richard Sibbes

NearGodTTT
Richard Sibbes ~ Drawing Near to God
The Saint’s Happiness adapted in Voices From The Past
Puritan Devotional Readings

Worldly reasoning will tell you that God does not see or govern, but has left the earth. But as we go into the presence of God we learn that all things are beautiful in their time (Ecclesiastes 3:11). All of God’s ways are merciful and true though we might feel much forsaken at the present.

The Holy Spirit teaches us to see that God is our best friend, and that he will never forsake us. God fills the whole earth and heaven with his presence. He is always present in power and providence by his Spirit in supporting, comforting, and strengthening the hearts of his children. God alone can fill every corner of the soul of man. God is a fountain that will never run dry.

If it is good to be near God, then the nearer we are to him, makes it even better. Man must not neglect God for any reason, and it is good to lose all for God. Why? because we have riches in him, liberty in him, and all in him. A man may be a king on earth, and yet a prisoner in himself. If we lose anything, even our own life for God, we shall save it.

Taste and see how good God is! (Psalm 34:8). How excellent is your loving-kindness, which you have laid up for them that fear you! (Psalm 36:7). ‘How precious to me are you thoughts, O God!’ (Psalm 139:17).

Labor to be near to him. God is near to all that call upon him. There is not a minute of time in all of our life but we must either be near to God or we will be undone. We must grow in our understanding and fill our thought with him. The soul is never at rest till it rests in him. The soul grows in the Spirit and finds sweet communion. Our affections mount up in prayer as in a fiery chariot to hear him speak to us, seeking comfort in our distresses.

Draw near to him in praise. This is the daily work of the angels and saints in heaven. Let us lift up our hearts with joy inexpressible (1 Peter 1:8).

David’s Conclusion; or, The Saint’s Resolution (1639) on Psalm 74:28 “But it is good for me to draw near to God.”

God’s children are swimming upstream and live contrary to the course of the world. They are living among men, and live as men do, but are moving in a different direction than the world, and are carried along by the Holy Spirit. Others may take whatever course they desire, but let us take this course: to draw near to God.

Drawing near to God is our chief good. It is our happiness to seek him. The nearer anything is to the principle of something, the better off it is. Nearer to the sun, the more light; nearer to the fire, the more heat; nearer to goodness, the more good; nearer to happiness, the more happiness.

“It is good”; that is, it puts in us a blessed quality and disposition. It makes a man to be like God himself; and, secondly, it is good, that is, it is comfortable; for it is the happiness of the creature to be near the Creator; it is beneficial and helpful. To draw near. How can a man but be near to God, seeing he filleth heaven and earth: “Whither shall I go from thy presence?” Psalms 139:7. He is present always in power and providence in all places, but graciously present with some by his Spirit, supporting, comforting, strengthening the heart of a good man. As the soul is said to be total in Toto, in several parts by several faculties, so God, is present to all, but in a diverse manner.

Now we are said to be near to God in diverse degrees:

first, when our understanding is enlightened; intellectus est veritatis sponsa; and so the young man speaking discreetly in things concerning God, is said not to be far from the kingdom of God, Mark 12:34.

Secondly, in minding: when God is present to our minds, so that the soul is said to be present to that which it minds; contrarily it is said of the wicked, that “God is not in all their thoughts,” Psalms 10:4.

Thirdly, when the will upon the discovery of the understanding comes to choose the better part, and is drawn from that choice to cleave to him, as it was said of Jonathan’s heart, “it was knit to David,” 1 Samuel 18:1.

Fourthly, when our whole affections are carried to God, loving him as the chief good. Love is the firstborn affection. That breeds desire of communion with God. Thence comes joy in him, so that the soul pants after God, “as the heart after the water springs,” Psalms 41:1.

Fifthly, and especially, when the soul is touched with the Spirit of God working faith, stirring up dependence, confidence, and trust on God. Hence ariseth sweet communion. The soul is never at rest till it rests on him. Then it is afraid to break with him or to displease him; but it groweth zealous and resolute, and hot in love, stiff in good cases; resolute against his enemies. And yet this is not all, for God will have also the outward man, so as the whole man must present itself before God in word, in sacraments; speak of him and to him with reverence, and yet with strength of affection mounting up in prayer, as in a fiery chariot; hear him speak to us; consulting with his oracles; fetching comforts against distresses, directions against maladies.

Sixthly, and especially, we draw near to him when we praise him; for this is the work of the souls departed, and of the angels in heaven, that are continually near unto him. The prophet here saith, “It is good for me”. How came he to know this? Why, he had found it by experience, and by it he was thoroughly convinced.

God will be near those who are careful to hold communion with him. “The Lord is near to all who call on him, to all who call on him in truth” (Psalm 145:18). Near to bless, to comfort, to give life, to guide, to support them. Let this encourage us to come to God—indeed, to run to him.

The father ran to meet the returning prodigal (Luke 15:20). God will be first with loving-kindness: “You will call, and the Lord will answer; you will cry for help, and he will say: Here am I” (Isaiah 58:9). God says, in effect, “What have you to say to me? What do you want from me? Here am I to satisfy all your desires.” Elsewhere it says, “Before they call I will answer” (Isaiah 65:24).
When we apply ourselves to seeking God, he is near to counsel, to give life, to defend—ready with blessing before our imperfect desires can be formed into requests.

I add this these words to keep in your heart…

Dearest Jesus, draw Thou near me,
Let Thy Spirit dwell with mine;
Open now my ear to hear Thee,
Take my heart and seal it Thine;
Keep me, lead me on my way,
Thee to follow and obey,

E’er to do Thy will and fear Thee,
And rejoice to know and hear Thee.

Underneath Thy wings abiding,
In Thy Church, O Savior dear,
Let me dwell, in Thee confiding,
Hold me in Thy faith and fear;
Take away from me each thought
That with wickedness is fraught,
Tempting me to disobey Thee,
Root it out, O Lord, I pray Thee.
(Dearest Jesus, Draw Thou Near Me)